MANN CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC

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                                   USE THE FOLLOWING TIPS TO HELP OUR KIDS GET AND STAY FIT.

  1. Find Activities Appropriate for Your Child: Some experts have found that aerobic exercise-running, playing, dancing, skipping or swimming- is a source of frustration, not fun, for overweight and obese children.  Help  your kids find physical activities that can help them gain self-respect and confidence-and that will be enjoyable.  Be sure to engage them in finding activities they like.
  2. Involve Your Kids in Preparing Meals:  In many families, planning and preparing meals can help children buy into weight management.  Involve children in shopping and food preparation.
  3. Keep Up a Positive Attitude:  Remember that the key to any change is repetition accompanied by positive reinforcement.  Experts agree that creative, integrative and nonjudgmental approaches, which actively involve children in finding solutions, work because they aim to change behaviors-the strategy that will reap long-term rewards.

When children are overweight, it's best to focus on becoming healthy rather than on losing weight.  Experts agree that increasing physical activity is the No. 1 way to battle childhood obesity.  Don't expect schools to provide all the necessary physical activity for your child.  Help your kids find exercises they enjoy, and encourage them to workout-or, even better, workout with them.

For more information on prevention and wellness, or to find a doctor of chiropractic near you, visit ACA's website at www.acatoday.org/patients.

WIN THE WAR, NOT THE BATTLE.

RECOGNIZE YOUR OWN FRUSTRATION.

INTRODUCE NEW FOODS IN SMALL AMOUNTS, MANY TIMES

HEALTHY LIVING

PATIENT INFORMATION FROM THE AMERICAN CHIROPRACTIC ASSOCIATION

PREVENTING EMOTIONAL EATING

Our relationship with food starts in childhood. In addition to modeling healthy behaviors, help your children develop healthy eating habits and avoid power struggles over food.

  • TRUST YOUR CHILD TO LISTEN TO HIS/HER OWN INTERNAL CUES ABOUT EATING.
  • ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD TO EAT WHEN HUNGRY
  • SERVE A WIDE VARIETY OF FOOD.
  • ALLOW YOUR CHLD TO STOP EATING WHEN HE/SHE FEELS FULL.
  • FACILITATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR PLEASURE.
  • HELP YOUR CHILD TO DEAL WITH BOREDOM OR NEGATIVE FEELINGS WITHOUT USING FOOD.

Remember, however, that activities that adults may prefer-such as working out on a treadmill for 30 minutes-may not excite a child.  Experts say that children engage in physical activity for three reasons: to have fun, make friends and learn something new.  They will not run for 30 minutes without stopping.  Instead, they play in short burst of activity, stop, recover and then run again.

  • DO NOT USE FOOD AS A REWARD.
  • DO NOT FORCE YOUR CHILD TO EAT FOODS HE/SHE DOESN'T WANT.
  • DO NOT FORBID ANY FOODS, SUCH AS SWEETS.
  • DO NOT RESTRICT THE AMOUNT OF FOOD YOUR CHILD NEEDS TO SATISFY HUNGER.
  • DO NOT CRITICIZE YOUR CHILD'S OR YOUR OWN BODY SIZE.
  • DO NOT PROMOTE DIETING.